Hello!

15 Answers

Please no negative Nancy’s… I am struggling and need help, not keyboard warriors…

My son has been reffered to see a pead as he is 2 and not talking. His daycare have also informed me that he is having some sensory troubles, such as not playing in paint, won’t eat or touch certain foods etc.
I asked the GP, what the likelihood of the pead wanting to assess him for autism, and they suggested it would be very high they would want to.
So my question is, what can I do to help my son? I have never been in this situation before, my other children have all spoken well before now. I know I need to wait to see what the pead says, but just want to help my son as much as I can. Thank you so much for your help


Posted anonymously, 3rd February 2021


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  • Your GP should be able to put you in touch with people who can help


  • I think I was about 3 when I started talking. I know my mum said she was scared but eventually one day I just started to speak when I was ready. It may just not be his time yet. I would highly recommend an OT. We have a son who I like to call quirky and the OT really helped him move up to what is considered normal. He is now a teenager and those childlike quirks are a lot less, but we just try to embrace them and work with them.


  • All you can do for now is treat your son the same as always. He hasn’t changed so make sure he knows how much you love him. My son was in his 20’s when he was diagnosed with autism but on the lower scale. The diagnosis didn’t change the way I felt about him but it did help me to realise why he acts certain ways. You are doing a great job so just wait for the appointment and take it from there


  • You’re doing the best you can and the right things. Seeing a Paed is the first step. My son has ASD/Aspergers and was diagnosed at age 10. As a result, we missed out on all the early intervention that was available. So you are doing the right thing. Every child is different, so I know it’s hard, but wait until you’re given an assessment. You will then learn to do what is best for your child.


  • Your not alone, I have recently realised my 2 year old son isn’t on par with what a book expects but to me he is perfect. I understand him but he cannot communicate with others. I’m seeing the peads for the same assessment this week. I’ll keep you posted. It’s the unknown but all will be fine.


  • Check also your son has had his hearing tested. My daughter needed grommets for her ears which delayed speech. She is fine now but couldn’t hear properly. There are also a lot of videos with suggestions online to use whilst waiting to get into speech. But constantly repeating words helps like door, open close etc when doing the action


  • I think the experts will be able to get you good advice. If there is a problem then catching things early as you are doing is important. It sounds like you are doing all the right things as far as reaching out. In my experience with a late speaker language was important, reading to the child, giving them as rich an experience as possible (instead of silence or a short sentence elaborate and interact!). But the experts will be able to tell you more, so you can focus your energies on what they recommend and not wear yourself out on things that may not need to be your focus.


  • Some kids are favourable in different areas my friends son didn’t talk until three although could mimic noises and was very active. He is now 5 and caught up with all other areas although does struggle with some pronunciation. Best of luck with it all.


  • My youngest has speech & OT since she was 1yr old and still has now she’s 7yr old. She has some sensory issues too. She benefited greatly from a key word sign language as well. Good to get a professional look at it which most likely will result in testing and referrals. Wishing you love & strength, xx


  • First stop is a speech pathologist! They will be able to tell you exactly what is going on and how best you can help your child. You will also need a hearing screener for your child before seeing the speech pathologist to rule out any hearing issues. You can get free hearing screenings through your local health centre. Information will be in your blue book as to how to book an appointment. Be aware there may be a waiting time so get onto that ASAP and look into speech pathology now as again, there may be a waiting list if you are going through the public system.

    You are a great parent – getting onto this early will help your child immensely and it is not too late! Please do not listen to others who may say “my child didn’t talk until they were X age” . Although they are trying to alleviate your worry, it does not take into consideration that some children will need speech pathology or hearing intervention to progress with their speech and language. All the best!!


  • Cant help you but sending lots of love


  • See what the paed says but it is likely your son would benefit from some therapy such as speech and and OT.


  • That doesn’t sound like anything major. I would say it’s pretty common for kids to not start speaking till after age 2. While I wouldn’t be panicking about it, it doesn’t hurt to get some early intervention. There is a lot of help available


  • Hi, my son has Autism, and I am a specialist teacher.
    My number one thought is to have a language rich environment, keep talking to him and with him, listen to songs, sing songs, read traditional nursery rhymes. My son didn’t talk until nearly 4 years, but then spoke in full sentences. Try to stay positive, but it might be an emotional time and that’s ok. There are some fantastic websites too.


  • Hi, I’m an Occupational Therapist so hopefully my tips can help you out.
    There is long waits for an Autism diagnosis, but the pead can refer you to NDIS for funding to support therapies without a diagnosis.
    I suggest looking in to some OT for the sensory issues and a speech therapist for the Speech issues.
    It’s great that they got onto this early as early intervention see’s such great progress :)
    in regards to the sensory difficulties, desensitising him to these types of activities through messy play may help. The OT can support you with this, or you could do some research. there are lots of lovely websites that have activity ideas such as https://www.ot-mom-learning-activities.com/ or face book groups.
    Best of luck :)


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