Hello!

  • Serves 25
  • 20 minutes
  • Difficulty Easy
  • 12 Ingredients

3 Comments

A truly delicious breakfast treat our family loves to eat on Christmas morning. Fresh, nutritious and the beautiful colours of Christmas really is a wonderful start to the day.
Seasons Greetings ..Have a Joyous Christmas and All the Very Best for the New Year EVERY ONE.


Ingredients (serves 25)

  • 1 cup SR flour
  • 2 Tbsp Sugar
  • 3/4 cup Milk
  • 1 Lge Egg
  • 1 Dessertsp Matcha powdered Japanese tea
  • Green food dye (optional) if indeed you require a very vibrant green
  • Butter for fry pan 30-40g
  • 1/2 cup strawberries and icing sugar (Sieved)
  • For the Coulis
  • 1 cup strawberries
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon

Method

  1. Place flour, matcha and sugar in a bowl. Make a well in the middle.
  2. Whisk milk and egg together and add to the flour, matcha and sugar mix and combine.
  3. Give the a good whisk till batter is smooth.
  4. Melt a tblsp of butter in pan and drop tblsp fulls of mixture onto the buttered pan on moderate to low heat.
  5. When bubbles appear flip the pikelets and cook till golden on the other side.
  6. For the Coulis: Place 2 cups strawberries with ¼ cup sugar and the juice of half a lemon in a saucepan and allow to simmer until the berries release their juices. Continue to simmer until the liquid is reduced by half, roughly 15-20 minutes.
  7. Arrange pikelets and strawberries on serving plate, pour over the coulis and sprinkle with icing sugar.
  8. Enjoy your delicious festive coloured pikelet delight.

Notes

The coulis can be made ahead of time and stored in the frig if you wish. And please the use of lactose free milk, gluten free flour and xylitol can be used with great success. I prefer to use pure Japanese Matcha but I do know that supermarkets sell matcha now so I am sure that will be fine also. Matcha (抹茶, Japanese pronunciation pronounced [mat.tɕa], English /ˈmætʃə/[1][i]) is finely ground powder of specially grown and processed green tea leaves. It is special in two aspects of farming and processing: the green tea plants for matcha are shade-grown for about three weeks before harvest and the stems and veins are removed in processing. During shaded growth, the plant Camellia sinensis produces more theanine and caffeine. This combination of chemicals is considered to account for the calm energy people might feel from drinking matcha. The powdered form of matcha is consumed differently from tea leaves or tea bags, and is dissolved in a liquid, typically water or milk. The traditional Japanese tea ceremony centers on the preparation, serving, and drinking of matcha as hot tea and embodies a meditative spiritual style. In modern times, matcha also has come to be used to flavor and dye foods such as mochi and soba noodles, green tea ice cream, matcha lattes, and a variety of Japanese wagashi confectionery. Often, the former is referred to as ceremonial-grade matcha, meaning that the matcha powder is good enough for tea ceremony. The latter is referred to as culinary-grade matcha, but there is no standard industry definition or requirements for either. Blends of matcha are given poetic names known as chamei ("tea names") either by the producing plantation, shop, or creator of the blend, or, by the grand master of a particular tea tradition. When a blend is named by the grand master of a tea ceremony lineage, it becomes known as the master's konomi, or a Butcher block of Leaf.

  • I enjoyed reading what you had written in the notes section, always wondered about the tea used in tea making.

    Reply

  • This looks very interesting, I love matcha as a hot drink and now learning how to use it in cooking.

    Reply

  • So wish some mums would pop by. <3

    Reply

Post a comment
Like Facebook page

LIKE MoM on Facebook

Please enter your comment below
Would you like to include a photo?
No picture uploaded yet.
Please wait to see your image preview here before hitting the submit button.
Your MoM account


Lost your password?

Enter your email and a password below to post your comment and join MoM:

You May Like

Loading…

Looks like this may be blocked by you browser or content filtering.

↥ Back to top

Thanks For Your Star Rating!

Would you like to add a written rating or just a star rating?

Write A Rating Just A Star Rating
Join