We all know that in the real world a stay-at-home-mum doesn’t usually get paid, even though it’s one of the most challenging jobs to do in the whole world. However if a SAHM did earn a salary, we would be earning what a CEO does (well, we are in fact CEO of the household and family! so it’s fitting!).

A recent study has calculated that full-time mothers should earn on average at least $230,000 a year, working on a working week of a whopping 96 hours.

This Salary.com tally was reached by surveying thousands of mums to determine how much time they spend doing all their everyday household duties.

The Hybrid Role Of A Stay At Home Mum

It may seem like a hefty sum but let’s take a look at all the roles that are wrapped up in the SAHM job role, including:
Academic adviser ; Accountant; Buyer; CEO; Coach; Day care center teacher; Janitor; Judge; Marketing manager; Plumber; Photographer; Psychologist; Staff nurse; Teacher

This estimated salary does highlight the variety of skills that stay-at-home parents have to master to do their jobs.

What’s Taking Up Our Time?

Another survey from Insure.com discovered that mums are devoting more of their time to being ‘party planners’ than ever before.

The other most time-consuming duties according to Insure.com include cooking (14 hours per week), driving (9 hours), childcare (40 hours) and those “miscellaneous” tasks that sum up to 40 more hours.

But of course, each mum is different so if you really want to know what you’re worth, check out Salary.com’s calculator, which allows you to pop in your own data to calculate what your own Stay-at-home paycheck should be.

And if you’re a stay-at-home or working dad, there’s a calculator for you too.

Some people have taken offense to the thought of SAHM being paid such a high salary, with one commenting “Taking care of your kids isn’t a ‘job’, it should be considered a privilege or a gift and no price tag or salary can be put on that.”

But many stay-at-home parents insist that it’s not about the money and that being around to be there for their kids is priceless. Despite this, it is nice to know that we are valued.

Do you think stay at home parents should be paid a salary? Tell us in the comments below.

More on Mouths of Mums


  • A smile and a thank you Mum for dinner or lunch is all I need that is my wage is that my kids recognise my hard work priceless

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  • No, I am a SAHM and don’t think I should be paid a wage (by whom?). However, if the SAHP (there are stay at home dads, too) is a SAHP by agreement, then the spouses super should be split between the two for as long as they deem the SAHP role necessary. I think the working partner needs to remember how relentless the SAHP role is, and consciously try and give the SAHP a bit of a break, just as they get a break from time to time. I used to work several white collar jobs at once, and it still wasn’t as intense as my current SAHP role, partly because I am 100% invested in how my two projects turn out! But it is the no sick days, no holidays, few breaks, that really wear upon one.

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  • No, they shouldn’t be paid (and I am one), but maybe offered some concessions similar to student discounts to acknowledge the low/ non-existent income.

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  • I don’t think they should be paid but the work should be acknowledged.

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  • Years ago there was an article printed in the Sunday times with the wages a stay at home parent should get paid. It listed everything that you would have to pay someone to do and how much per hour should be paid. It was a real eye opener and it was in Aus dollars.

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  • Stay at home parents are amazing. Would be nice to be paid as its a 24/7 hour job!

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  • It looks like salary.com’s calculator is only for U.S. residents?

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  • It’s important to value SAHM’s but that doesn’t have to be with a price tag or salary.


    • For sure – evey parent should be valued.

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  • Being a mum is a 24/7 job that had no sick leave.

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  • I agree, we work hard around the clock but aren’t considered to be working at all. It takes a lot of work and endurance as a mother

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  • What about all the working Mums that work 50 hour weeks, go to all kids sports, sit up all night with kids when sick, still go to work the next day, cook, clean, wash they do everything stay at home Mums do and more they don’t get any recognition or praise. They work to support there children don’t ask for handouts and teach there children the value of work and the time they have with their children is quality time but no one talks about them and their value

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  • So who exactly is going to be paying us?

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  • Oh funny. The thing is, if you are on low wage, you pretty much get paid for being a SAHM from centrelink. Thank you!

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  • Seriously. No. If you cannot afford to have kids don’t have them. How many lazy people who don’t want to work do you think will have kids just to get money out of the tax payers. Once again why should people who choose not to have kids have to work to pay for those that want kids so they can stay at home and get paid more than those that actually go to work. Bad idea.

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  • You already get the baby bonus, which I never did and family allowances for those who under the threshold, our Government cannot even lift the poorest out of poverty, we need a rise in Newstart, and we cannot afford to pay stay at home mums, motherhood is a choice and you should plan for it financially if you can, otherwise just learn to make ends meet like our mothers and their mothers did.

    Reply

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