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This little group of muscles is so often left off the list in the struggle to shed those post baby kilos – and yet they are literally the foundation for the core of the body!

Pilates is actually one of the best exercise programs to help women rebuild their pelvic floor post pregnancy or during menopausal changes.

More than a million Australians suffer from light bladder leakage (LBL), yet 95 per cent of these females neglect the important pelvic floor exercises, which are so essential in managing and preventing the condition.

Pregnancy and childbirth rank in as the number one cause of LBL, accounting for more than 80% of cases.

I speak to a lot of mums who are delighted by the impact that a few simple ‘DIY’ steps can have on something that has such a big impact on their lives.

Where there is a will there is a way

More than 90 per cent of LBL sufferers surveyed as part of the new Poise Pilates Pulse were keen to take action to relieve or even eliminate their symptoms but more than half admitted they simply forgot.

People mistakenly believe pelvic floor exercises are difficult or time consuming – they are neither!

It’s all about adopting a routine and sticking to it to improve bladder issues.

Simple things like – if you are stuck in traffic, sitting at your desk or even waiting to cross the road, seize the opportunity to exercise your pelvic floor muscles. No one will know!

Get flexing

Pelvic floor muscles are the foundation for the core of the body. They help keep the pelvis stable and support our organs in the lower abdomen such as the bladder and uterus.

We focus on strengthening these muscles during Pilates.

Routines such as the Poise Wellbeing Workout are designed for women of all fitness levels, to support the core and build pelvic floor strength improving both body and mind.

My Top Tips:

  • Think about a four-point diamond from the pubic bone, to the tail bone and the two sit bones, picture the four points drawing up through the centre of the pelvis
  • Stand on one leg and balance for 5-10 seconds, you may need to hold a wall to begin with and gradually increase the time you can hold the leg up. Following this, repeat on the other side.
  • Make sure you inhale through the nose and out through the mouth as the diaphragmatic (deep breathing) movement encourages the lift of the pelvic floor

Click here to discover more pelvic floor exercises.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.com
  • Always good to be reminded of this.

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  • I often sit on the couch watching tv of a night time and do my pelvic floor lifts. I didn’t realise the standing on one leg helps too, so I’ll be adding that one to my routine

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  • I had a midwife who suggested doing pelvic floor exercises while you’re doing everyday things like waiting for the lights or watching a commercial

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  • very important to not forget about your pelvic floor

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  • I have had lower back surgery, so these excercises are out for me, swim, swim swim, the best excercise and least impacting on the body as we age.

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  • My physio told me to lie on my back, and knees bent, leaning out and relaxed. Breathe in, then on the expiration, pull up the pelvic floor. A good way to isolate those muscles.

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  • Pelvic floor exercises always seem so confusing. The only one that isnt confusing is the…. scratch that they are all confusing

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  • great tip thanks

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  • I love pelvic floor exercises. Because you can be a couch potato (sometimes) and do them. I also love the V Crunch. Try doing them on the edge of a coach, with a Basketball between your knees.

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  • great tips and some I have not heard before

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  • thank you these are different to others I have heard ill give them a try

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  • I try to do them while I’m watching TV or reading a book.

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  • Thank you for the exercise tips.

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  • I had to have a hysterectomy and I must admit Im really confused about what exercises i can do and what i cant.

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  • Thanks for the prompting. There’s never a bad time to do pelvic floor exercises — just need to remember!

    Reply

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