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Nappy rash describes a variety of skin conditions that can appear in the nappy area.

The discomfort level for baby can range from mild to severe.

How to recognise Nappy Rash

Nappy rash appears as inflamed, red and blotchy skin on the skin covered by nappies. There may be blistering and occasionally ulcers. The rash may sometimes spread to the tummy and bottom.

It’s sore, can hurt when bub passes urine, and can lead to unsettled and unhappy babies.

What causes nappy rash?

A major cause is when a baby’s skin is exposed to wet or dirty nappies (the combination of heat, damp and friction in a nappy), but it can also be triggered by medications, new foods and chemical irritants, such as unnatural baby lotions, detergents and nappy soaking solutions.

Babies who suffer eczema or cradle cap are prone to nappy rash, and babies who have family members who suffer dermatitis may be more likely to suffer from this skin irritation.

Prevention and Treatment

  • Frequent nappy changes can help, although the problem can sometimes continue, no matter how often a nappy is changed.
  • Let baby have some nappy free time each day (lie them on a soft towel).
  • Avoid chemical based products.
  • Switch to cloth nappies for the duration of the rash, and ensure cotton nappies are thoroughly washed to remove all traces of detergents and chemicals.

See your health care professional if the rash persists for more than a week as there may be an underlying skin condition such as thrush, dermatitis or psoriasis.

The Little Innoscents Massage Oil can be used to treat and prevent both dermatitis and psoriasis.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.com
  • I found the application of beaten egg whites to my babies nappy rash helped considerably, combined with everything else on you list, my babies only ever had cloth nappies

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  • make sure they get nappy free time to air it all out

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  • Love the avoid chemicals for prevention tip

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  • Good suggestion to seek extra help if the condition persists.

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  • thankyou, thankyou , thankyou

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  • It’s do hard to to nappy free time with boys. Any ideas?

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  • Thanks for sharing this helpful information. Lots of ‘free’ time seems to help too!

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  • prevention is better than cure…every time!

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  • I also think that nappy rash clears up when you avoid using any baby wipes – just pay a damp cotton pad to clean the area (no harsh wiping or rubbing).


    • My Grandma used pieces of old cotton sheeting which she damped a little before. If her daughter-in-law took her granddaughter there to be basbysat she usually had her in disposables if she had a rash. Grandma couldn’t wait for her to leave! She would take off the disposal and wash her gently is she had been perspiring ot not cleaned properly, give her some free time, then put her in a towelling nappy. If necessary she would apply some natural nappy cream. Within 2 days the nappy rash was either completely gone or almost. The Mum had about 3 dozen towelling nappies and Grandma had some she had been given by her sister whose granddaughter no longer needed nappies.

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  • I found vasaline worked a treat with my daughter! created a barrier so it didn’t bother her anymore

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  • that is what I used to do when mine where babies

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  • I found Sudocream worked a treat, would not use anything else. Fresh air time without nappies is also great.

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  • Thanks for the info. For those that use sudeocrem, it only contains about 15% zinc oxide. I recently used Desitin which has 40% to help my toddlers sore bottom.

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  • I use codliver oil, it works 100% of the time.

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  • I have been told by a health professional that Mylanta Liquid is good too. Apparently it is used in some hospitals. It isn’t sticky like creams or lotions are. Sudocreme is the only one that works on one baby I know. If I put it really thickly on the quite red patches a couple of times the rash clears up quite quickly, sometimes in less than a day. Our gandparents used to use talcum powder but it has been discovered that most of them have aluminium in them, even the baby powder. Some of the generic brands were aluminium free.

    Reply

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