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When her  five-year-old daughter tossed out her Curvy Barbie for being “too big,” this mother had an important message to share.

Taking to Instagram, body positivity campaigner, Allison Kimmey from Florida, shared the conversation between her and her daughter Cambelle.

“Can you tell me why you threw away one of your perfectly good toys?” Allie asked.

“Because I don’t like her. Her arms aren’t right. Her legs are too big. She doesn’t look like my other Barbies and she doesn’t fit into any of the clothes except this one outfit,” Cambelle responded.

Allison shared, “I paused. I was speechless. I honestly felt some tears start welling in my eyes. I related to this inanimate object. It was as if curvy barbie’s life was a reflection of the way I felt for SO long being a plus size woman in a thin woman’s world.

“I always felt like my arms weren’t right, my legs were big, and anywhere I went, nothing fit. For a very long time I allowed those perceptions and the constricts of society make me feel as if I was the trash.

“Much like myself, Curvy barbie is still living in a thin barbie world.

M:”How do you think barbie feels now that you put her in the trash? Was that a very nice thing to do?”
C:”I think she feels sad and crying.”
M:”Just because her body is different, does that mean that she is wrong?”
C:”No, mama. Because she has more fat. And it’s okay to have fat.”
M:”And just because the clothes don’t fit her right, does that mean she shouldn’t be able to play with the other barbies?”
C:”No mama. We have to be kind to everyone.”
M:”Do you have friends that look different than you?”
C:”Yes, mama. Some have skinny legs and other girls like me have legs that touch.”
M:”Okay, we’ll leave that discussion for another time. Do you think that you could wash her off and find her something to wear?”
C:”Yes, mama.”

Allison explained, “each time I am put in a position where I can ignore these early signs for body image issues and pass them off as “oh she’s just a kid playing with her barbies, maybe she really just doesn’t like this one, it doesn’t REALLY matter” OR I can make a conscious effort to help her dissect how she’s feeling, allow her to explain her discomfort, and give her a new loving perspective.
Just do you!”

My daughter threw away her Curvy Barbie. M:”Cambelle!” C:”What mama?” M:”Did you throw away this barbie?” C:”Um. Yes.” M:”Okay. Can you tell me why you threw away one of your perfectly good toys?” C:”Because I don’t like her. ” M:”What do you mean you don’t like her?” C:”Her arms aren’t right. Her legs are too big. She doesn’t look like my other barbies. And she doesn’t fit into any of the clothes except this one outfit.” I paused. I was speechless. I honestly felt some tears start welling in my eyes. I related to this inanimate object. It was as if curvy barbie’s life was a reflection of the way I felt for SO long being a plus size woman in a thin woman’s world. I always felt like my arms weren’t right, my legs were big, and anywhere I went, nothing fit. For a very long time I allowed those perceptions and the constricts of society make me feel as if I was the trash. Much like myself, Curvy barbie is still living in a thin barbie world. M:”How do you think barbie feels now that you put her in the trash? Was that a very nice thing to do?” C:”I think she feels sad and crying.” M:”Just because her body is different, does that mean that she is wrong?” C:”No, mama. Because she has more fat. And it’s okay to have fat.” M:”And just because the clothes don’t fit her right, does that mean she shouldn’t be able to play with the other barbies?” C:”No mama. We have to be kind to everyone.” M:”Do you have friends that look different than you?” C:”Yes, mama. Some have skinny legs and other girls like me have legs that touch.” M:”Okay, we’ll leave that discussion for another time. Do you think that you could wash her off and find her something to wear?” C:”Yes, mama.” I go deeper into this conversation on my blog (link in profile). But for now I will leave you with this: each time I am put in a position where I can ignore these early signs for body image issues and pass them off as “oh she’s just a kid playing with her barbies, maybe she really just doesn’t like this one, it doesn’t REALLY matter” OR I can make a conscious effort to help her dissect how she’s feeling, allow her to explain her discomfort, and give her a new loving perspective. Just do you! Xoxo Allie

A post shared by ALLIE ???? Just Do You, Babe! (@allisonkimmey) on

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  • Fantastic mum to talk to her child that way.

    Reply

  • Wow, what are we doing to our kids? This was a great teaching moment, but also a reminder of the sponges that our children are in what they hear, observe, understand.

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  • What a great mum and a great object lesson to teach her daughter to be accepting.

    Reply

  • Her mother handled the issue wonderfully.

    Reply

  • Good on this mum for tackling this issue. It’s a hard issue but one that has to be talked about consistently.

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  • My daughter prefers the curvy Barbie, she looks ‘real’ is what she says.

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  • I”m surprised that the manufacturer didn’t cash in on the manufacture of clothes for the “curvy” Barbie

    Reply

  • An opportunity to get creative and create and make clothes for her doll. People and dolls come in all shapes and sizes and a good lesson to learn.


    • Body shape conversations are so important to have with children. Establishing good body image thoughts is a must.

    Reply

  • This mum used the situation well to bring up an important conversation. Time to get some more outfits for curvy barbie !

    Reply

  • I love this article!!!! i think more parents should take this on board and help to teach their children that not everyone is the same and we shouldn’t be that doesn’t mean that we aren’t perfect in our own way. I think this will help shape kids to be more positive when it comes to body image and maybe there will be less bullying in our schools.

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  • What a wonderful example you are setting for your daughter and hopefully other girls. I have boys and body image seems to present in different ways, however I will not forget this approach.

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  • I think that was a well handled conversation.

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  • Think curvy barbie needs to have a few more clothing options.

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  • I think that from that girl’s action, came out a very interesting conversation. I didn’t know there were Curvy Barbies on the market. What a wonderful idea!!

    Reply

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