When fruit and vegetables are shipped, trucked, and flown from farm to market, both the commercial and organic produce industries utilise devices to absorb the ethylene gas that fruits and vegetables emit as they ripen. The use of these devices essentially stops the ripening process so that produce can be shipped to market looking freshly picked, and not wilted or fuzzy.

The ripening of fruit and vegetables is a chemical process that is caused by ethylene gas, a natural plant hormone. It initiates and accelerates the ripening of fruit and vegetables, and then causes them to deteriorate. By lowering the level of ethylene gas surrounding fruits and vegetables, their shelf life can be greatly increased, slowing the maturation of fruit, protecting vegetables, and greatly reducing spoilage.

These ethylene gas absorbing or neutralizing devices (with an organic carrier medium of volcanic ash) have been utilized safely by both the organic and commercial produce industries for over 20 years.

Most fruit (including avocados and tomatoes) should be stored at room temperature and away from direct sunlight until ripe. Tropical fruit such as pineapple and bananas are chill sensitive and should not be stored in the refrigerator.

To reduce wilting due to water loss, keep leafy and root vegetables, such as silverbeet, broccoli, carrots and parsnips refrigerated. Also by removing leafy tops from carrots, parsnips, turnips and beetroot, their storage life can be extended many weeks whilst in the refrigerator. Keep potatoes in a cool, dark, well ventilated place to avoid greening and sprouting. Sweet potatoes however are cold sensitive and should not be kept in the fridge. Apples pears, stone fruits and strawberries can be refrigerated. Citrus fruits, cucumbers, passionfruit, capsicums and eggplant can lose water easily during refrigerated storage.

Different varieties of a fruit and veggies often have better keeping qualities than others at a given storage temperature.

BluApple – a simple, organic, non-toxic, BPA-free and recyclable device for the home and business  extends the storage life of produce up to three times longer. The BluApple provides a solution to the problem of keeping expensive produce fresh, adapting technology that has been used safely and successfully by the commercial and organic produce industries for decades.

Scientific research was carried out by PostHarvest Fresh, an independent research and consulting company located at Sydney University, Sydney, confirmed that BluApples stored with fruits and vegetables were found to significantly reduce ripening and softening.

The BluApple brings industrial strength technology to your home to reduce spoilage and extend the useful life of your produce. The product can simply be placed in the refrigerator produce drawer or fruit bowl and the contents are protected from ethylene gas. It’s as simple as that. By changing the packet inside every three months, you have a permanent solution to the produce storage problem. BluApple users will reduce waste and save money.

  • We don’t buy alot all at once because of fruit and vegetables going off and it is a waste of money to throw food out!

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  • I try to store most things in the fridge. Separating stuff from green apples helps as well, they have a ripening agent that they let off

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  • cheers for the education. love learning

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  • Some produce is stored in atmosphere controlled (temperature contolled) coolrooms, either on the producer’s property or a storage facility. These include apples and pumpkins. If it is still there, there is a facility at Lenswood in the Adelaide Hills.

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  • thanks for sharing these tips – hate seeing food go to waste

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  • Great information thanks for sharing. I always keep my fruit in the fridge cause it goes off so quickly.

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  • i hate to see wasted fruit & veg, but the possums love it :/

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  • When they are out of season they can be kept in cold storage for several months.
    Storage in shops isn’t as cold, and some fruit and vegetables go in and out of storage a few times. A lot of fruit is picked really green and hard and you usually need to leave it out of the fridge to finish ripening. They you have it in a warm atmosphere. Some fruits deteriorate fairly quickly.
    A word of warning. Sometimes bananas may still be firm but and look OK while you are peeling them but they may be brown in the inside. I bought too many on occasion and decided to peel and freeze them rather than cutting them open first. When I ate 2 small ones I was violently sick for a few hours. I recently bought 2 when I had 2 young children (1 a toddler) visiting. When I peeled one I only peeled it part way down them broke it in halves. The inside of it was really brown.

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  • Very useful information. Thank you for the article.

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  • i would rather my fruit ripen naturally but i know that all these farmers have to induce ripening to be able to get the mass amount of produce that the companies need. i love to support the local growers and buy direct though if i am able. i love going to the local market and supporting those who grow their food naturally in their backyard

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  • Thanks for sharing this article; very interesting.

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  • Apples go into cold storage at a regulated temperature – ac ( atmosphere controlled). In the supermarket aisle the temperature is warmer as indeed it is at home, possibly even in your fridge. Some fruit and vegetables are also mist sprayed on supermarket shelves to prevent shrinkage.

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  • Thank you I might be able to eat more fruit nd veg before it goes off

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  • Some interesting facts,

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  • I’ll have to get me some of those BluApples, organic vegies are expensive enough to buy to use let alone throw away.

    Reply

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