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STUDY finds babies born via caesarean are 59 percent more likely to be obese by the age of five.

According to a review of existing research by the MRC Centre of Reproductive Health at the University of Edinburgh, children born by c-section were also 21 percent more likely to develop asthma by the age of 12, compared to those born naturally.

Caesarean delivery was associated with increased odds of childhood obesity at up to 5 years when compared with vaginal delivery.

Published in the PLOS Medicine Journal, the study found women are less informed about the long-term risks of having a c-section to themselves, their babies and future pregnancies.

The research, which looked at 79 scientific studies involving over 30 million women, found mothers were more likely to have a miscarriage if they decided to become pregnant again after the c-section.

Women with previous cesarean delivery also had increased odds of having placenta accreta compared to women with a previous vaginal delivery.

“Cesarean delivery is associated with future subfertility and several subsequent pregnancy risks such as placenta previa, uterine rupture and stillbirth,” the research suggested.

Women with previous cesarean delivery had increased odds of having placenta previa, as well as placental abruption, compared to women with a previous vaginal delivery.

The research hopes to increase discussions between patients and doctors about the long-term implications of c-section births. Read the full study here.

In conclusion they wrote, “Although we cannot conclude that cesarean delivery causes certain outcomes, patients and clinicians should be aware that cesarean delivery is associated with long-term risks for the baby and for subsequent pregnancies and a reduced risk of urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse for the mother.

The significance that women attribute to these individual risks is likely to vary, but it is imperative that clinicians take care to ensure that women are made aware of any risk that they are likely to attach significance to. Women and clinicians thus should be aware of both the short- and long-term risks and benefits of cesarean delivery and discuss these when deciding on mode of delivery.”

Read more: Caesarean births are linked to developmental delays

Share your comments below

  • I know a lady who had an un-planned C-section. Because the incision there was a lot of things she was not allowed to do for at least 3 weeks, other things she had to wait longer. Initially she wan’t allowed to lift her arms above a certain height, she wasn’t allowed to hang washing up, some types of cleaning. Fortunately her husband had already learnt and started doing some of the housework. He wasn’t able to take holidays as he worked in a trade that always took all their holidays over Christmas into January. Her and his mothers helped her during the day with their older child who was just 2 y.o. and still in nappies.

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  • What about if a woman has no choice but to have them by “C” section because she cannot have them naturally? I had to have all my three children by “C” section and all my children are obese. I think it depends on the person and the circumstances and not all children become obese. With all studies they can manipulate the results to reach whatever results they want.

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  • I think this might be one of those cases where the chances of being obese are higher, because there is this misconception on what women are capable of post c section and letting them know they can regain their strength and be active with their children. Maybe just an observation by myself, but despite growing awareness of active lifestyles during and post pregnancy, there is still a lot of misunderstandings of what we can do.

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  • There are always lots of studies. If I had delivered by c-section I would not be too concerned.

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  • Every woman should be aware of the risks involved with all birthing situations.

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  • My kids were born by C-section and none of them are obese. Thankfully I hadn’t complications either.

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  • What will they come up with next. I have three children all c-sections. I didn’t choose it that way I had to have them. My first little girl and I nearly died. My daughter was old 6lb 10oz not huge but I couldn’t deliver a baby more than 5lb because I have a small pelvis. I went on to have a son @ 6lb 9oz and another daughter at 6lb. If I left it to people that make up rubbish like you then possibility I might never have enjoyed being a mum and now a grandma. So think on and perhaps in future keep your wild stupid stupid thoughts to yourselves

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  • Anf its between either me or/and my baby dying during childbirth or an increased risk of my five year old being fat, I know exactly which path I’m going to choose. Scalpel!

    Reply

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