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A mum has asked why dads are not allowed to stay on the post-natal ward with their partner and baby after the birth…

UK journalist and mother Annie Ridout has taken to Twitter to ask why many hospitals don’t allow fathers to remain in the post-natal ward with their partner after they’ve given birth. Annie said she believes the rule is ridiculous and fails to reflect the importance of a father’s support and presence for both mum and baby.

Just Not Fair

Annie said she began questioning the hospital policy after her own birth experience. “My local hospital doesn’t allow partners to stay on the post-natal ward after their baby has been born,” she tweeted. “I think this is outrageous – unfair on the mother, unfair on the father who is being made to feel unimportant. He needs to bond too.” With most dads wanting to play a significant role in the early days of their child’s life, Annie questioned why they weren’t being given every opportunity to do so.

Comments on Annie’s tweet revealed that many couples find the rule distressing. “My husband was sent home, I had our first at a little birthing centre,” one mum wrote. “He got me settled in my room and then had to leave. He said it was the oddest night of his life going from euphoria to solitude.”

Another mum pointed out the social implications of preventing fathers from staying with their partner and baby in the days after birth. “We have to get fathers involved from day one (if they are around) so that we address gender inequality and get more women back to work.”

We think many women would love the chance to have their partner beside them every step of the way. The days after birth can be some of the most difficult and nothing can replace that kind of support.

Was your partner allowed to stay with you on the post-natal ward? Share your story in the comments.

  • Yeah I think they should be allowed. I would have loved to have hubby share that first night with baby and me.

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  • I think they should allowed.

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  • I do believe that if you want your partner to stay with you they should be allowed to. I understand some Dad’s can’t stay because there are other children but it should be your choice. You need that personal support when going through labour.

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  • I got induced at 7pm and didn’t get sent to the maternity ward until 9pm.
    Because I went through the public system I didn’t have my own private room and my partner wasn’t allowed to stay because it was a breech of privacy and safety for other mums in the ward aswell. Even despite the fact I was already in early labour and was planned to have my waters broken at 7am at the latest if they didn’t break themselves or I didn’t go into active labour.
    My partner had to drive home to stay the night, only to be called back to be there at 4am.
    My baby was born in the morning, but due to being under weight we had to stay in another night for monitoring. My partner was asked to leave at 10pm because there was another mum across from me, who’s partner was allowed to stay all night. Even though she was only having Braxton Hicks and there was no sign of early labour for her.
    I was very disappointed that they allowed this other partner to stay but they wouldn’t allow the partner of a new mum to stay. I didn’t sleep the night I was induced, due to pain and I didn’t sleep the following night because the other woman and her partner were arguing all night.
    I think as long as they don’t disrupt anyone they should be allowed to stay. Having a baby is a big adjustment, I don’t get why they expect us to do it on our own the very first night.

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  • Of course they should but things have changed in our lives now.

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  • Mine stayed with me for ages and came back frequently. They didn’t seem to be too strict on visiting hours if he was already on the ward either.

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  • I had quite a traumatic first birth and although our first child so no home duties and my husband could stay- the option wasn’t available for him to at our hospital. He was allowed to come and go and stay as long as he wanted but no offer to actually stay. I think it would have been a lot easier for me personally with him there and would welcome it.

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  • Yes, my hubby did stay with me in my room for a couple of nights. I had a traumatic birth so it was fantastic to have his support, particularly with the agency staff not really up to the task during the night.

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  • Definitely should be allowed!

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  • Definitely they should

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  • Absolutely yes

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  • I shared a room with 6 ladies and totally can understand why the dad’s are not allowed to stay.
    Whilst I think it’s very important that the dad’s are there for support and to bond, creating and maintaining that bond is a life long process and really doesn’t rely on those first couple of days. Th

    My first was prem and was directly whisked away to be checked and transferred to NICU. Whilst I was being stitched up and didn’t get to see her at all till a day later, my husband was there during the checks and transport. I remember I was so jealous !!

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  • Hubby was allowed to stay with our first child but with the second he wasn’t but this was because it was during COVID times.
    Visiting times were also tough. It was a morning slot and an arvo slot. Between the times of 12 to 4, no one was allowed in the rooms!
    Agree it can be tough, especially if you’re a first time mum, the pressure can really get to you and having your partners support by them even just being there helps so much.
    Agree that I don’t think it’s fair either!

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  • Where I had my kids,they were encouraged to stay overnight hence the double bed. It was nice.

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  • If it’s a room with multiple patients, I totally understand the ban. If it’s a private room, then it should be allowed.

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