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Zoe Saldana gave birth to her now 10-month-old twin boys prematurely last November and she recently spoke with PEOPLE Magazine about her experience.

The 37 year old actress who married Marco Perego back in July 2013 admits that she struggled to cope when her babies were immediately taken to a Neo-Natal Intensive Care unit in an LA hospital.

“When I was in the neonatal intensive care unit with my two sons, I became like every parent that was on that floor. My husband and I were at the mercy of our nurses and doctors — our children’s lives depended on their every move.” The actress told PEOPLE.

After her experience the Avatar star has teamed up with Brave Beginnings, a not-for-profit organisation that helps ensure hospitals have access to life saving equipment they need to help premature babies thrive.

When talking about Brave Beginnings the star says “I went through it, I was there. I was a parent and my children were the ones that benefitted from having excellent services from the hospital. And I want that for every parent. I want that for every child.”

SHARE your thoughts with us in the comments below.

  • Gorgeous babies

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  • Beautiful baby boys! Wonderful mum for sharing her experience. I really need to start buying New Idea or TV Week because I am so clue to most of the celebs on MoMs

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  • Great read thanks for sharing :)

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  • I really loved this lady’s comments. Very candid.

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  • Looks like she doesn’t want to show their faces?

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  • The people that work on these ward are amazing our journey would have been so much harder without them

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  • These twins are so adorable.

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  • yes medical staff do a great job.

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  • She must have got really lucky with her medical staff. Most are pretty bad, in my experience.

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  • Wow, twins, busy busy busy mum and dad. Lucky you’ll have enough money to hire a nanny!

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  • So pleased to see her babies home and well. The NICU is such an important service for not only the babies, but the entire family.

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  • What an amazingly strong woman

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  • My second baby was whisked away after her birth to the special care nursery, the step below NICU.
    I was lucky she was able to stay at the same hospital as me (except for one night she spent at the NICU at the children’s hospital – thankfully just as a precaution after she went there for a couple of tests) which made it slightly easier to deal with.
    The nurses in the SCN and the ones I was in contact with at the NICU while she was there were just amazing. They always were friendly and had a smile and time for even a quick word with us (and other parents whose babies were in there).
    It didn’t matter what time of the day or night you came to visit your baby, they let you in and made you feel so welcome to be there.
    I was lucky and was able to go home with my little girl after only a week, I don’t know how parents whose little ones are in SCN/NICU for months cope sometimes.
    And I don’t know how the nurses can have such compassion and care for every single case, I would find it so hard seeing so many sick babies, especially the really tough ones and touch-and-go ones.
    Thank you to all and any past, present and future NICU and SCN nurses!! You are amazing!!

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  • Lke it

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  • Such a heartfelt story so glad she now has two healthy and happy bubs .. All the best to her and her family

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